Blog

This past September over 1500 women attended the CLUW Conference held at Detroit Renassiance Marriott. The crowd of women "Took It To The Streets" in front of the Spirit of Detroit Statue. 

Students say the outsourcing issue cuts to the heart of what the institution’s values are. EVENTS SHOW HOW WE CAN ALL HELP EACH OTHER The Merriam-Webster dictionary definition of solidarity is “unity (as of a group or class) that produces or is based on community of interests, objectives, and standards.” With the UAW, that is always the case, but three recent situations involving UAW members clearly show what the word is in action.
EARTHQUAKES, HURRICANES AND A PANDEMIC HAVE HIT THE ISLAND HARD It’s been a difficult stretch for Puerto Rico in the last couple of years. People there have been hit with hurricanes, earthquakes and now a pandemic. But whatever challenge is thrown at our 5,000 members who work at a variety of public and private entities, they know their UAW family is ready to pitch in.
On June 23, 1963, over 125,000 people marched down Woodward Avenue in Detroit, Michigan in the 'Walk to Freedom.' The march was the largest civil rights demonstration at the time highlighting the injustices African Americans faced across the country.
For Gerald Kariem, Juneteenth feels even more special in Detroit. So many successful Black Americans today are descendants of the millions of men and women who left the south for work in the north starting back in 1916 to build Ford cars.
Today, we take time to honor the memory of our lost brother, George Floyd. We will sit still, we will put down our tools and silence our phones for 8 minutes and 46 seconds. A full eight minutes and 46 seconds -- the agonizing amount of time that Mr. Floyd lay on the pavement begging for his life.
Dear Sisters and Brothers, As trade unionists and as Americans, we were outraged and heartsick at the horror of George Floyd’s death on May 25. It was yet another tragedy in a long and sorrowful history of the divisiveness of racism in this nation. Since that day in communities from coast to coast, we have seen Americans from all walks of life, black, brown and white, stand together to demand change. To demand – finally – that we address the systemic racial divide that has plagued our nation since its inception.
My Sisters and Brothers, I want to begin this message by recognizing the strength and courage of this union and each and every one of you. These past couple of months have been extraordinarily difficult for all of us — and for all of America. And as we work to open up our economy and go back to work, I know there are so many concerns and fears.
Dear Sisters and Brothers, On May 19, two dams in mid-Michigan failed, leading to massive floods that devastated families in that area. Over 11,000 people were evacuated, and thousands of homes were destroyed. There is always a difficult road to rebuilding after this kind of tragedy, but it is even more challenging to do so in the age of COVID-19.